Cool Parts Of African Countries You’ve Probably Never Seen Before

Western media tends to show very limited images from Africa, most of which include examples of extreme poverty or the vast savannahs where wild animals live. However, the continent is extremely diverse in both its geography and population, and it has some wondrous sights to behold.

These are some of the most beautiful and interesting parts of Africa that you’ve likely never seen before.

Fontainhas In Cape Verde

colorful houses on cliff edge with blue water in background
Photo Credit: Martin Zwick / REDA&CO / Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Martin Zwick / REDA&CO / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The iconic small mountain village of Fontainhas is located in the mountains on the island of Santo Antão, Cape Verde. The country of Cape Verde is an archipelago of volcanic islands off the northwestern coast of mainland Africa. The country was uninhabited until the 15th century when Portuguese settlers colonized the islands.

Galawa Beach In Comoros

Galawa Beach, Grand Comore.
Photo Credit: Robert VAN DER HILST/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Robert VAN DER HILST/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Comoros (formally the Union of Comoros) is a volcanic archipelago located off the southeastern coast of mainland Africa in the warm waters of the Mozambique Channel in the Indian Ocean. Its beautiful beaches and historic mosques from its Arabic roots are a sight to wonder at.

Chefchaouen In Morocco

Colorful alley with flowers hanging on the walls
Photo Credit: Fabrizio Crippa / Archivio Fabrizio Crippa / Mondadori via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Fabrizio Crippa / Archivio Fabrizio Crippa / Mondadori via Getty Images

Chefchaouen is a city located in the Riff Mountains of Morocco. It’s famous for the gorgeous blue-washed buildings in the “old town” of the city. The steep cobbled lanes make for a beautiful walk, and there are many local leather-making and weaving shops located in this area.

Avenue Of The Baobabs In Madagascar

Baobab trees along a dirt road,
Photo Credit: DEA / C.DANI / I.JESKE / De Agostini via Getty Images
Photo Credit: DEA / C.DANI / I.JESKE / De Agostini via Getty Images

These are Baobab trees, a species of deciduous tree nicknamed “upside-down trees” due to their thick trunks and foliage that only grows at the very top. Located in the city of Morondava, this road through the trees is a beautiful site often visited by tourists.

Temple Of Hathor And Nefertari In Egypt

temple of Hathor and Nefertari, also known as the Small Temple, in Abu Simbel
Photo Credit: LUDOVIC MARIN / AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: LUDOVIC MARIN / AFP via Getty Images

While Cairo and the Pyramids of Giza tend to draw the most tourists, there are many other visit-worthy archaeological sites in Egypt. Also referred to as the Small Temple, the temple of Hathor and Nefertari in Abu Simbel is a great historical landmark.

Lac Rose In Senegal

Plumes of orange and red on Lac Rose on the edge of Dakar, Senegal.
Photo Credit: David Degner / Getty Images
Photo Credit: David Degner / Getty Images

Located about 30 kilometers north-east of the city of Dakar, Lac Rose is a saline lake. The lake naturally contains red or orange hues due to a special type of algae that lives in the water.

The Rwenzori Mountains In Uganda

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Photo Credit: Martin Zwick / REDA&CO / Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Martin Zwick / REDA&CO / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

This is a photograph of the Portal Peaks in the Rwenzori mountain range in Uganda. The Bujuku Valley is also in view. This area is a UNESCO World Heritage Site due to its unique high-elevation ecology.

Tiébélé In Burkina Faso

An man sits in the courtyard of his house in the notable village of Tieble's royal court
Photo Credit: OLYMPIA DE MAISMONT / AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: OLYMPIA DE MAISMONT / AFP via Getty Images

The royal court of Tiébélé is located southwestern Burkina Faso near to the country’s border with Ghana. The locality is famous for its traditional Kassena architecture and the houses painted with beautiful geometric designs.

Blyde River Canyon In South Africa

red rock canyon with river snaking through
Photo Credit: ALEXANDER JOE / AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: ALEXANDER JOE / AFP via Getty Images

Blyde River Canyon is the third-largest canyon in the world. Locals call these rock formations, which were shaped millions of years ago by erosion, “The Potholes.” The bizarre swirl holes developed when the once rapid river carried masses of sand and debris, which gradually wore down the rock.

Yamoussoukro In Ivory Coast

An Ivorian couple and their baby arrive for a mass in Yamoussoukro's
Photo Credit: ISSOUF SANOGO / AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: ISSOUF SANOGO / AFP via Getty Images

Yamoussoukro, one of two capitals of Ivory Coast (Côte d’Ivoire in French), is one of the most beautiful cities on the continent, with French-influenced buildings and gorgeous landscapes. Pictured here is the famous Notre Dame de la Paix Basilica, a popular tourist destination in the city.

Zanzibar Beach In Tanzania

gorgeous beach with white sand
Photo Credit: Per-Anders Pettersson / Getty Images
Photo Credit: Per-Anders Pettersson / Getty Images

This is a fishing village beach located on the island of Zanzibar in the country of Tanzania. Zanzibar is a popular tourist destination due to its beautiful beaches and culture, which fuses Indian, Arabic, and mainland African influences.

Cape Cross In Namibia

flamingos on beach in front of buildings with red roofs
Photo Credit: Hoberman / Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Hoberman / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Cape Cross is a segment of Namibia’s “Skeleton Coast”—the northern part of the country’s coastline on the Atlantic Ocean where the Namib desert meets the water. Cape Cross is a protected area for wildlife and even has a seal reserve.

The Sudd In South Sudan

An aerial picture shows Islands jutting out into a lake amid the vast swamplands of the Sudd
Photo Credit: PHIL MOORE / AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: PHIL MOORE / AFP via Getty Images

South Sudan is a relatively new country in central Africa, but the vast Sudd swamplands, which are formed by a section of the White Nile river, have been around for centuries. The Dinka, Nuer, and Shilluk people live alongside the Sudd and use the area extensively for raising livestock and farming.

The Church Of Saint George In Ethiopia

CROSS shaped church carved into ground
Photo Credit: EDUARDO SOTERAS / Getty Images
Photo Credit: EDUARDO SOTERAS / Getty Images

Located in Ethiopia, the Church of St. George (also known as Bete Giyorgis) was carved directly into volcanic rock, the only material in the whole building. Built in the 12th or early 13th century, the contemporary king of Ethiopia had wanted to recreate Jerusalem in his land.

Lake Malawi In Malawi

Clouds at dawn on Lake Malawi,
Photo Credit: DeAgostini / Getty Images
Photo Credit: DeAgostini / Getty Images

Lake Malawi hosts a variety of wildlife including Nile crocodiles, hippos, and fish eagles. The lake is vital to the local economy since many locals take to the waters for fishing. While mostly in Malawi, the lake also extends partially into Mozambique and Tanzania.

Victoria Falls In Zambia

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Photo Credit: DEA / V. GIANNELLA/De Agostini via Getty Images
Photo Credit: DEA / V. GIANNELLA/De Agostini via Getty Images

Located in Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park in Zambia, Victoria Falls on the Zambezi River is home to a plethora of wildlife. It has a bigger sheet of falling water than Niagara Falls and is almost twice the height!

Dougga In Tunisia

partially intact building with greco-roman features
Photo Credit: Werner Forman/Universal Images Group/Getty Images
Photo Credit: Werner Forman/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

In Tunisia, you can visit the Roman ruins of Dougga, a small town of the Roman Empire that flourished from about 100–300 AD. Pictured here is the Capitolium, the principal temple dedicated to the Roman gods Juno, Jupiter, and Minerva.

Praslin Island In Seychelles

Granite boulders and crystal clear sea in an islet in front of Praslin island, Seychelles.
Photo Credit: DEA / V. GIANNELLA / Getty Images
Photo Credit: DEA / V. GIANNELLA / Getty Images

Seychelles, a multi-island nation located in the Indian Ocean, boasts some of the most beautiful beaches and clear waters in the world. In addition, the island is a natural source of granite.

Abuja National Mosque In Nigeria

mosque with large gold dome and four enormous columns
Photo Credit: PIUS UTOMI EKPEI / AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: PIUS UTOMI EKPEI / AFP via Getty Images

Built in 1984, this beautiful mosque is located in Nigeria’s capital, Abuja. The building is open to Muslim and non-Muslim visitors alike, though non-Muslims are forbidden to enter during prayers. The building was designed so that it can be seen clearly from many different parts of the city.

Kakum National Park In Ghana

Canopy walkway in Kakum National Park
Photo Credit: Wolfgang Kaehler / LightRocket via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Wolfgang Kaehler / LightRocket via Getty Images

Located near the coast of Ghana in western Africa, Kakum National Park protects the rainforests which are home to a variety of endangered mammals, such as forest elephants, bongo antelopes, and various primate species. Visitors can view the vegetation and wildlife by traversing the Canopy Walkway, a bridge suspended 30 meters above the ground.