Incredible Natural Wonders To See In The United States

Our planet is full of amazing natural wonders for people to see in every corner of the world, but those who live in the United States are lucky enough to have a lot of those wonders in their own backyards (or at least their own states).

The U.S. has so many amazing national parks and naturally occurring sights that it could be hard to decide which ones you want to see, but we’ve got you covered.

Thor’s Well — Oregon

thor's well oregon
Photo Credit: Flickr / John Fowler
Photo Credit: Flickr / John Fowler

With a name like “Thor’s Well,” it’s got to be an impressive thing to see, right? You couldn’t name it after The Avengers and then risk underwhelming people with its presence. Also known as the Drainpipe of the Pacific, Thor didn’t disappoint with this one.

Nā Pali Coast — Hawaii

hawaii na pali coast Kauai
Photo Credit: Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

You’re expecting to see beautiful scenery if you’re going to Hawaii, but Kauai’s Nā Pali coast is a particularly impressive section of the islands that’s worth at least taking a boat ride past to have a look.

White Sands National Monument — New Mexico

white sands national monument new mexico sand dunes
Photo Credit: Greg Vaughn /VW PICS/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Greg Vaughn /VW PICS/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

If you’re planning your great American road trip and feel like skipping over New Mexico, think again, and consider checking out White Sands National Monument. The park in the northern Chihuahuan Desert is known for the rare white-sand dunes and dramatic landscapes.

The Florida Reef — Florida

florida barrier reef scene
Photo Credit: Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The Florida Reef (also referred to as the Great Florida Reef or the Florida Keys Reef Tract) is the only living coral barrier reef in the continental United States. The Florida Reef is the third largest reef system in the world, behind the Great Barrier Reef and Believe Barrier Reef, and it’s only a few miles seaward of the Florida Keys!

The Wave — Arizona

the wave rock formation arizona
Photo Credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP via Getty Images

Due to the fragile nature of this sandstone rock formation in Arizona, if you’re planning on visiting The Wave, you’ll need to plan ahead. A daily lottery system is used to distribute 10 next-day permits, or you can use the online system four months ahead of the trip, but it’ll be worth it to see this amazing location.

Acadia National Park — Maine

bass harbor maine acadia national park
Photo Credit: John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images
Photo Credit: John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

Acadia National Park in Maine is just a stone’s throw away from Bar Harbor (depending on how far you can throw), so if you’re visiting one, you might as well visit the other. Acadia includes ocean coastline, lakes, wetlands, mountains, and all the wildlife you’ll need for your Northeast U.S. adventure.

Assateague Island — Maryland

GettyImages-687636182
Photo Credit: Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics via Getty Images

You’re telling me Maryland has an island full of wild horses that they’ve been hiding away for all this time? Assateague Island (which lies primarily in Maryland but also partly in Virginia) is known for the horses that roam freely on the island, but it also plays host to 320 bird species.

Glacier National Park — Montana

bearhat mountain above hidden lake in glacier nationa lpark
Photo Credit: Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

You know that Montana has some pretty wonderful scenery, but until you experience something like Glacier National Park in person, you won’t be able to fully understand the amazing landscapes the U.S. is home to.

Ricketts Glen State Park — Pennsylvania

rickets glen state park waterfall
Photo Credit: Flickr / Gene Krasko
Photo Credit: Flickr / Gene Krasko

Ricketts Glen in general is worth a trip if you’re in Pennsylvania, but especially if you’re looking to be impressed by a waterfall (and honestly, who isn’t?). The park has more than 20 significant waterfalls, including Harrison Wright falls, which is nearly 30 feet tall.

Skyline Drive — Virginia

virginia view from skyline drive
Photo Credit: KAREN BLEIER/AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: KAREN BLEIER/AFP via Getty Images

If you’re looking for the perfect place to take a nice scenic Sunday drive with the family, Skyline Drive in Virginia’s Shenandoah National Park is exactly what you’re looking for—especially if you’re looking for amazing fall foliage.

Monument Rocks — Kansas

kansas monument rocks
Photo Credit: Getty Images
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Also referred to as the Chalk Pyramids, Monument Rocks are a series of chalk formations in Kansas that are estimated to have formed around 80 million years ago. The Monument Rocks combined with Kansas’ Castle Rock are jointly named as one of the 8 Wonders of Kansas.

Hall Of Mosses — Washington

washington olympic park hall of mosses
Photo Credit: Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

You’ve either stepped into a fairy-tale forest or the Hall of Mosses Trail in Olympic National Park. The lush, nearly mile-long trail is great for anyone feeling like they need a true escape from civilization and to be transported into another world.

Grand Prismatic Spring — Wyoming

yellowstone park grand prismatic spring
Photo Credit: Marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

If we’re talking about amazing natural wonders, especially in the United States, Yellowstone’s Grand Prismatic Spring has to be included. The colorful hot spring is the third largest hot spring in the world, and it’s easy to see why it’s such a popular destination for anyone passing through Wyoming.

The Northern Lights — Alaska

northern lights in alaska
Photo Credit: Lance King/Getty Images
Photo Credit: Lance King/Getty Images

Seeing the Northern Lights would be considered a bucket list experience for many people, and rightfully so. Alaska is one of the many places that you’d be able to see the aurora borealis, just keep heading North and you’ll find a spot eventually!

Valley Of Fire State Park — Nevada

valley of fire park nevada road
Photo Credit: George Rose/Getty Images
Photo Credit: George Rose/Getty Images

You don’t even need to get out of your car if you don’t want to, but if you’re in Nevada, you don’t want to miss out on taking a drive through at least part of the 46,000 acres of bright sandstone that make up the Valley of Fire State Park.

Black Canyon Of The Gunnison National Park — Colorado

black canyon gunnison nationalnpark colorado
Photo Credit: RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images
Photo Credit: RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

The Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park in Colorado has some of the steepest cliffs and rock spires you can find in North America. There are countless hiking trails for beginners and experienced hikers alike, plus great fishing and kayaking spots.

Niagara Falls — New York

niagara falls new york
Photo Credit: Dinendra Haria/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Dinendra Haria/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

It’s one of the seven wonders of the world, so who are you to say that you don’t want to be dazzled by the amazing structure that is Niagara Falls? Whether you view it from the New York side or make your way across the border, it’s hard not to marvel at it.

Garden Of The Gods — Colorado

garden of the gods balanced rock
Photo Credit: Harvey Meston/Archive Photos/Getty Images
Photo Credit: Harvey Meston/Archive Photos/Getty Images

Colorado’s Garden of the Gods park is impressive enough in its own right and definitely worth a visit. While visiting the Garden, though, you’ll want to make sure you go to see the famous balancing rock that—you guessed it—is a very large rock that mysteriously balances on its own.

Sequoia National Park — California

giant sequoia tree grove in sequoia national park
Photo Credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP via Getty Images

No matter how tall you are, you’re going to feel small standing among the groves of California’s Sequoia National Park. The park is where General Sherman calls home—the largest known living single-stem tree on Earth, standing at 275 feet tall—as do countless other sequoia trees, which are all ready to impress you with their height.

Tallulah Gorge — Georgia

waterfalls at tallulah river in north georgia
Photo Credit: MyLoupe/UIG Via Getty Images
Photo Credit: MyLoupe/UIG Via Getty Images

The 2,600-acre Tallulah Gorge State Park in Georgia is a beautiful place in nature, but if you’re really looking for some excitement, then you have to check out the 1000-foot deep Tallulah Gorge that runs through the center of it all.