The Most Dangerous Hiking Trails Around The World

Going on a hike isn’t as easy as just putting one foot in front of the other. Depending on where you go, you might have dangerous variables like a steep and narrow path, wild animals, guerrilla fighters, or heat. But if you love the thrill, then we say go for it!

Just be careful, as some of these trails can leave you severely injured, or worse…dead.

Huayna Picchu, Peru

GettyImages-1161481402
Photo Credit: NurPhoto / Getty
Photo Credit: NurPhoto / Getty

The Huayna Picchu, also known as the “Hike of Death,” takes a few casualties every year. It’s made of an old Inca staircase carved out of granite, and it climbs about 1,000 feet in less than a mile.

Plus, you have to deal with rotting, crumbling rock, slippery stones, and exposed corners—some areas require holding on to a steel cable. Going up is the “easy” part. Then you have to come down a steep slope.

Caminito del Rey, Spain

Caminito del Rey
Photo Credit: @holatourclub / Instagram
Photo Credit: @holatourclub / Instagram

This narrow cliffside walking route is located in Spain’s Malaga mountains. It was once used by power station workers and was known at the time as the “world’s most dangerous pathway.”

This is because several people fell to their deaths over the years until the local authorities reconstructed the path and improved its safety standards—to a certain degree, anyway.

Angel’s Landing, United States

Angel's Landing
Photo Credit: @ajrobach / Instagram
Photo Credit: @ajrobach / Instagram

Angel’s Landing, formerly known as the Temple of Aeolus, is a very narrow and long rock formation in Zion National Park, Utah. Its name was given because of a point at the peak that is so small that “only an angel can land on it.”

Although they have support chains for the last narrow, rocky steps, the trail is still not considered safe.

Mount Hua Shan, China

GettyImages-1001907032
Photo Credit: Xinhua / Tao Ming / Getty Images
Photo Credit: Xinhua / Tao Ming / Getty Images

Don’t do this trail if you’re afraid of heights. Only a few have merited entry into the ancient temples at its summit. The trail has narrow wooden boards attached to the side of the mountain, with rusty chains for hikers to hold onto.

But in some sections, the boardwalk disappears altogether with just carved out rock instead.

Drakensberg Grand Traverse, South Africa

GettyImages-1150361772
Photo Credit: Leisa Tyler / LightRocket / Getty Images
Photo Credit: Leisa Tyler / LightRocket / Getty Images

This 300-kilometer trail is also known as the “Dragon Mountains” by Afrikaners and as the “Barrier of Spears” in Zulu. The worst part is the beginning of it, where you have to get up two questionable chain ladders to get to the cliff.

Just pray it doesn’t get windy, otherwise it’s quite the drop.

Kalalau Trail: Hawaii

GettyImages-566349219
Photo Credit: Andrés Araiz / Getty
Photo Credit: Andrés Araiz / Getty

This trail has an amazing panoramic view of the surrounding canyon…if you ever make it there. Their mantra is “Don’t look down.”

The trail goes down a steep ocean cliff 4,000 feet above a deadly tide. There are no rails to hold onto. Plus, you have to deal with slippery mud.

Mount Pinatubo, Philippines

GettyImages-909123908
Photo Credit: STR/AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: STR/AFP via Getty Images

This is one of those trails where it’s not the actual hike that’s dangerous, but the variables that can’t always be predicted. The hike is easy enough, but you never know when the neighboring volcano will just erupt again.

More than 72 people have fallen victim to this hike. The last eruption released 15 million tons of sulfur gas onto the mountain.

Kokoda Track, Papua New Guinea

GettyImages-539999145
Photo Credit: Fairfax Media via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Fairfax Media via Getty Images

This trail is known for its 2009 accident where 13 people died in a plane crash on their way to the trail, while four more hikers died on the trail. The trail takes 11 days to get through. Hikers have faced malaria, extreme heat, frigid nights, and daily soaking rain.

The trail also has ankle-deep clay muck, slippery roots, and waterfalls.

Devil’s Path, United States

Devil's Path
Photo Credit: @siann92 / Instagram
Photo Credit: @siann92 / Instagram

Located in New York state, the Devil’s Path was named by Dutch settlers who thought only a demon could get across the rocky, serrated summits.

Hikers climb over 4,000 feet of elevation gain, half a dozen major peaks, and uneven traverses. If exhaustion doesn’t take you out, you might be able to complete the whole thing in a single day.

Keshwa Chaca (Q’eswachaka) Rope Bridge, Peru

Keshwa Chaca (Q'eswachaka) Rope Bridge, Peru
Photo Credit: Luis Rosendo / Heritage Images / Getty Images
Photo Credit: Luis Rosendo / Heritage Images / Getty Images

This is a hand-woven rope bridge that spans 220 feet across the Apurimac canyon, 60 feet above the Apurimac River. It doesn’t mean it’s safe or sturdy enough to cross, however.

It is mostly kept as a way to honor traditions and ancestors, as it’s thought to be the last Incan rope bridge in Peru. Incans used natural grass fibers to craft it.

The Maze, United States

The Maze, UT
Photo Credit: @auput / Instagram
Photo Credit: @auput / Instagram

The Maze, as the name suggests, is made up of interconnecting canyons that are incredibly easy to get lost and disoriented in.

Only about 2,000 hikers visit every year, and many run into dead ends and find it hard to navigate the narrow passageways. This means many hikers need to be rescued from the labyrinth on a regular basis.

Aonach Eagach Ridge, Scotland

GettyImages-588404408
Photo Credit: Tom Welsh / N-Photo Magazine / Future via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Tom Welsh / N-Photo Magazine / Future via Getty Images

This trail is considered to be one of the most daunting ridge walks in Britain, thanks to its exposed scrambles and ascents and descents high above Loch Leven.

Don’t try it unless you’re an experienced hiker.

Cascade Saddle, New Zealand

Cascade Saddle, New Zealand
Photo Credit: @be_griff / Instagram
Photo Credit: @be_griff / Instagram

The Cascade Saddle is made of an 11-mile, two-day trip through a beech forest and alpine meadows. At least 12 people have fallen to their deaths while descending due to the rocks being wet and slippery.

However, if you make it to the top, you’ll get beautiful Lord of the Rings views.

Maroon Bells South Ridge, Colorado

GettyImages-1160257818
Photo Credit: RJ Sangosti / MediaNews Group / The Denver Post via Getty Images
Photo Credit: RJ Sangosti / MediaNews Group / The Denver Post via Getty Images

Maroon Bells South Ridge has a brutal hiking trail that leads to a 14,000-foot peak. Many have died or gotten injured trying to climb the exposed rocks of the vertical alpine trail.

However, the view of shadows over Maroon Lake, the surrounding peaks, and the forested mountain valleys below might just be worth it.

Yosemite’s Half Dome, United States

GettyImages-1180276120
Photo Credit: George Rose / Getty Images
Photo Credit: George Rose / Getty Images

This trail was once believed to be completely inaccessible due to its almost 9,000-foot elevation. Today, however, the summit can be reached through an 8-mile trail that is tiring and includes lots of switchbacks and hundreds of feet of granite stairs.

The top is the hardest part, with the final 400 feet going almost vertically straight up and nothing but two metal cables holding you.

Via Ferrata, Italy And Austria

GettyImages-1150811303
Photo Credit: Karl-Josef Hildenbrand / picture alliance / Getty Images
Photo Credit: Karl-Josef Hildenbrand / picture alliance / Getty Images

When soldiers had to climb the mountain during the Second World War, they had a much harder time. Today, hikers are offered walkways, bridges, and even ropes and cables to use while on the cliff faces.

However, you still have to know what you’re doing if you don’t want to fall off.

West Coast Trail, Canada

GettyImages-997039680
Photo Credit: Leisa Tyler / LightRocket via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Leisa Tyler / LightRocket via Getty Images

This is a 48-mile trail along the Pacific coast has some of the most rugged terrain in the world. High tide on the seaside sections can leave you stranded or carry you into the sea.

The woodland section is made of narrow wooden ladders, rickety bridges, and boardwalks. If you stay overnight, you might even encounter wolves, cougars, and grizzly bears. No hiker has completed the trail with no injuries.

Rover’s Run Trail, Alaska

GettyImages-1176343634
Photo Credit: Wolfgang Kaehler / LightRocket via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Wolfgang Kaehler / LightRocket via Getty Images

This is probably the physically easiest trail on our list, with no steep drop-offs, technical climbs, or extreme weather. Instead, the area is filled with brown bears, especially in the summer.

Many hikers have encountered them by the rivers as it’s filled with salmon, and many maulings have been reported. The trails sometimes have to close when there are signs of masse bear activity.

Table Mountain National Park, South Africa

GettyImages-918617934
Photo Credit: Frédéric Soltan / Corbis via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Frédéric Soltan / Corbis via Getty Images

There are various trails that can be explored like Devil’s Peak and Lion’s Head. Their elevation and high cliffs give beautiful views of Cape Town’s City Bowl and the South Atlantic.

However, the park warns that “…more people die on Table Mountain than Mount Everest” most years due to falls, and even murder sometimes.

Ha’iku Stairs, Hawaii

Ha'iku Stairs,
Photo Credit: @traveler_4esss / Instagram
Photo Credit: @traveler_4esss / Instagram

This dangerous path is made of 3,922 metal stairs rising 2,800 feet. They were originally built in 1942 to make a radio tower to send transmissions to Navy ships. They were forbidden to the public after a fatal rockslide killed eight people and injured 42 in 1999, and a tram was built instead, but that also got damaged in 2015 by a storm.

For now, it is still illegal to climb the stairs.

Bright Angel Trail, Arizona

GettyImages-563602863
Brian Vander Brug/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
Brian Vander Brug/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Beginning on the south rim of the Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona lies the Bright Angel Trail. The trail is extremely strenuous, as hikers make their way down to the Colorado River, walking 4,380 feet down a very steep trail.

It’s easy for hikers to become dehydrated in the extreme heat. The dangerous waters of the Colorado River can also cause hypothermia and have a risk of drowning.

Mount Washington, New Hampshire

GettyImages-1228928337
Erin Clark/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
Erin Clark/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

The ridges of Mountain Washington are no joke. Located in New Hampshire, Mount Washington is the highest peak in the Northeastern United States. The winds are what make this hike extremely dangerous.

At the summit, the winds have reached a recorded 231 miles per hour, holding the record for the highest recorded wind speed that’s not a tornado or tropical cyclone.

Longs Peak, Colorado

GettyImages-161076304
Hyoung Chang/The Denver Post via Getty Images
Hyoung Chang/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Scaling 14,259-feet, Longs Peak is the highest point in Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado. The trail hasn’t been conquered by many, and not all of the hikers who’ve attempted it have survived.

Only hikers with great skill and experience should attempt Longs Peak. Its danger is evident just by looking at it.

Peek-a-boo Gulch, Utah

Peek a boo gulch
Unsplash/Walker Fenton
Unsplash/Walker Fenton

Located along the Hole in the Rock trail in southern Utah is the Peek-a-boo Gulch. While this location might look pretty, there’s a real possibility of getting stuck in the gulch.

And even if the possibility is low, mentally, there’s a good chance that you’ll psyche yourself out. Don’t get stuck!

Abrams Falls, Tennessee

GettyImages-144078264
Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Located in the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, Abrams Falls is a beautiful sight– there’s no question why people hike here. The slippery rocks from the falls are what hikers have to look out for at Abrams Falls.

It is not recommended to attempt the hike unless you have the proper gear for grip and stability. You’ll also need to time the season.

Huckleberry Mountain, Montana

GettyImages-1175619045
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Named after the huckleberries around the trail, the lookout at Huckleberry Mountain is quite a feat to get to. The trail is located in Glacier National Park, Montana.

And due to its difficulty, it isn’t likely to be crowded. The steady climb requires stamina and strength, so be prepared!

Striding Edge, England

people walking
Anna Gowthorpe/PA Images via Getty Images
Anna Gowthorpe/PA Images via Getty Images

Why anyone would want to hike a trail with a daunting name like this is mind-boggling, but they do it! The name explains it all and you can see from the image that these people are close to the edge.

Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala

active lava
Getty Images
Getty Images

This trail is off-limits to hikers these days, but people still find a way to slip through the cracks every year. Clearly, there’s a level of danger that doesn’t compare to other hikes thanks to the lava.

GR 20, Corsica

GR 20
Lieberenz/ullstein bild via Getty Images
Lieberenz/ullstein bild via Getty Images

This is a hike where getting down is far more dangerous than getting up! This trail is prone to diverse weather affects, so you would be smart to opt-out of doing this one. It’s okay if you’re friends call you a chicken.

Taghia Rock Wall, Morocco

Morocco
Pinterest
Pinterest

You can find the Taghia Rock Wall in the beautiful destination of Morocco! Located in the Atlas Mountains, you can’t be afraid of heights at all. To scale it, you need complete balance since this is what they call a “sheet cliff.”

Mt. Rainier’s Muir Snowfield, Washington State

hikers
grapefruit26/Reddit
grapefruit26/Reddit

Many have lost their lives on this treacherous trail thanks to the harsh storms that come around. Even if you brave it during the warmer months, this is still a deadly trail in Washington.

Coelophysis, Wendenstöcke

The Wendenstöcke hiker
Reddit
Reddit

If you want narrow paths where you can easily lose sight or vertical cliff faces, this is the trail for you. This is a 9,000 foot climb and you need the stamina of an athlete to accomplish it.

Knivskjellodden (North Cape), Norway

Knivskjellodden in norway
Pinterest
Pinterest

The best part about this trail are the ocean views once you reach the summit! The sights are so beautiful, people often get too close to the edge and that’s when bad things happen.

Buckskin Gulch, Utah

trail
Richard Cummins/Corbis via Getty Images
Richard Cummins/Corbis via Getty Images

As of 2019, no one has died here. That’s good to hear, but please, don’t become the first one! This is the deepest and longest slot canyon in the Southwest and maybe even the world.

Barr Trail, Colorado

people in the snow
Helen H. Richardson/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images
Helen H. Richardson/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Listen to this. 22 of the 50 lightening incidents reported in Colorado since 2000 have involved fearless hikers and the popular electric spot is this trail right here. The peak is 14,115 feet.

Denali, Alaska

A lone climber stands on the Summit Ridge at Denali on Mount McKinley, Alaska.
Getty Images
Getty Images

On Mount McKinley rests a beast of a trail called Denail. Wilderness and adventure combine perfectly for this hike, but you might need to carry something like a machete to cut through bushes so you can reach the trail you want.

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah

Nice Scenary
Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Things for this trail aren’t the same since invested parties want to reduce the two-million acres. It still has one of the best sheer drop-offs, jagged cliffs, gulches, and many more aspects you love about a tricky trail.

Oku-Hotaka to Nishi-Hotaka Traverse, Japan

Oku-Hotaka to Nishi-Hotaka Traverse
MARK RALSTON/AFP via Getty Images
MARK RALSTON/AFP via Getty Images

Many who have done this trail in Japan call it one of the nation’s most dangerous. Oku-Hotaka is Japan’s third highest summit, so you know this is one for the books.

Rim To Rim: Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

woman sitting
Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images
Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

We’ve included a trail in the Grand Canyon already, but this is rim to rim. This is one of the most intense experiences you can attempt if you’ve got the courage.

The Paintbrush Canyon-Cascade Canyon Loop: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

PAINTBRUSH-CASCADE CANYON LOOP
Reddit
Reddit

This has to be one of the most scenic hikes on this trail, which makes it so tempting regardless of how sketchy it is. Rangers suggest wearing a bear bell if you’re going to tackle this monster.