The Pros And Cons Of RV Living

With the cost of rent or of owning a home being so high, many people are looking at other modes of living, including tiny homes or mobile homes. For people who have the ability to work remotely and desire to travel often, living in an RV or renovated bus has become increasingly popular.

While RV living can be exciting and fun, there are some aspects of it that are less than ideal. These are some of the pros and cons of RV living.

Con: Tiny Bathroom Problems

The bathroom in any RV or camper is pretty much the same size as your typical airplane bathroom, except it also has a shower in that same space. Trying to change your clothes in one is a recipe for disaster.

toilet
Photo Credit: Christof Koepsel / Getty Images
Photo Credit: Christof Koepsel / Getty Images

Pro: It’s Easy To Travel And See The Country

Always wanted to see the mountains in Montana? Been dying to drive along California’s coastline? It’s easy for you to go from place to place and comfortably travel with your belongings using an RV.

mountains in Montana
Photo Credit: George Rose / Getty Images
Photo Credit: George Rose / Getty Images

Con: Stovetop Cooking Is No Easy Feat

The stovetop in a camper van is small, to say the least, making meals a little more difficult to prepare. In addition, using the stove will make the whole vehicle hot, which is not so great when you’re camping in warm areas.

Cooking food on stovetop in a campervan on a rainy day in England
Photo Credit: Photofusion / Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Photofusion / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Pro: You Can Relocate To Your Prefered Climate

Find the winters in the north a little too cold and gloomy? Just drive south to a warmer place. Find the southern summers unbearably hot? Just drive north. It’s easy to follow the weather you want at any time of year.

The skyline of Miami, Florida
Photo Credit: ROBERTO SCHMIDT / AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: ROBERTO SCHMIDT / AFP via Getty Images

Con: Get Used To Cold Showers

The reserve of hot water in a camper only lasts for about the first five minutes of a shower. Either you get used to showering really quickly, or you get used to cold showers.

woman under shower head
Photo Credit: Fairfax Media via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Fairfax Media via Getty Images

Pro: You Can Get Some Amazing Views From Your Bedroom Window

Whether you’re on the move or are parked at a specific location, your bedroom view is entirely up to you, and it’s constantly changing. You get to wake up to some of the most stunning natural landscapes on an average day.

RV driving down Parks Highway, Alaska
Photo Credit: Edwin Remsburg / VW Pics via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Edwin Remsburg / VW Pics via Getty Images

Con: Constant Grocery Shopping

You don’t have a lot of storage space for food, and the fridges in RVs are generally very small, meaning you have to buy small amounts of food very often.

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Photo Credit: Christopher Furlong / Getty Images
Photo Credit: Christopher Furlong / Getty Images

Pro: It’s A Cheaper Alternative To A House Or Apartment

Compared to the cost of renting a home or of mortgage payments, a mobile home costs significantly less per month despite the costs involved in maintaining the vehicle and parking at campsites.

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Photo Credit: BAY ISMOYO / AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: BAY ISMOYO / AFP via Getty Images

Con: Relying Solely On Laundromats Can Be Irritating

Obviously, when traveling in a mobile home, you can’t exactly lug around a washing machine and dryer. Having to find and use laundromats all the time is not always the greatest experience, especially when traveling in desolate areas.

A long row of laundry dryers
Photo Credit: JEFF HAYNES / AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: JEFF HAYNES / AFP via Getty Images

Pro: You Feel More In Touch With Nature

Compared to regular city or suburban living, your home is so small that you end up spending more time outside of it and immersing yourself in natural surroundings around campsites.

A visitor to Yosemite National Park in California admires the view of Tenaya Lake from Olmsted Point, a popular destination in the park featuring views of Yosemite Valley
Photo Credit: Robert Alexander / Archive Photos / Getty Images
Photo Credit: Robert Alexander / Archive Photos / Getty Images

Con: Limited Access To The Internet

Depending on where you’re located at any given time, you might not have access to the internet. This can be a problem if you plan to work remotely or if you require internet access to navigate.

A hand stealing a bar of wi-fi access
Photo Credit: Don Clark / Condé Nast via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Don Clark / Condé Nast via Getty Images

Pro: It Inspires A More Minimalist Lifestyle

Living in an RV, you don’t have a lot of storage, so you have to focus on what items you really need. It’s a great way to figure out what you truly find important versus what is just “stuff” to you.

Cute pink camping trailer with an outdoor bathroom
Photo Credit: Getty Images
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Con: It Gets Noisy Very Easily

Since you’re living in such a small space with others, you can hear every noise people make inside and lots of noise from outside. If you’re a light sleeper, you’re going to need earplugs.

person with earplug in
Photo Credit: JEWEL SAMAD/AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: JEWEL SAMAD/AFP via Getty Images

Pro: You Get To Meet A Lot Of New People

Campsites and national parks are often busy with other travelers staying a couple of nights and passing through, meaning you get to meet people from all over while you’re out in the world.

young people sitting together at campsite
Photo Credit: Sean Gallup / Getty Images
Photo Credit: Sean Gallup / Getty Images

Con: Campsites Can Be Crowded

Campsites in the busy seasons are often packed, meaning that you’re constantly surrounded by other people and their noise. There’s no real way to sit outside without being surrounded by others.

People relax and talk amid a row of parked campers and trailers at the Wagon Wheel Trailer Park
Photo Credit: Aladdin Color Inc / Getty Images
Photo Credit: Aladdin Color Inc / Getty Images

Pro: You Feel Closer To Your Family

When spending time driving across the country with your family, you’re bound to have some quality bonding time and end up closer to each other. You’ll all learn to be more cooperative in the process.

A family from England watch the sea
Photo Credit: SAKIS MITROLIDIS / AFP via Getty Images
Photo Credit: SAKIS MITROLIDIS / AFP via Getty Images

Con: No Privacy From Others Living With You

While you’re bound to bond while lumped together in a mobile home, there’s also bound to be friction. You don’t really have any alone time or personal privacy in an RV.

A family enjoys a weekend with their motorhome at the Monte Holiday campsite
Photo Credit: Carlos Alvarez / Getty Images
Photo Credit: Carlos Alvarez / Getty Images

Pro: Cleaning Up Is A Piece Of Cake

Because the space is so small and you are lugging around fewer possessions, cleaning up is a breeze. You can vacuum out the whole place, wipe down the counters, and straighten up in less than an hour.

person with cleaning supplies and spray bottle
Photo Credit: Lars Baron / Getty Images
Photo Credit: Lars Baron / Getty Images

Con: They Eat Gas Like It’s Nothing

Unfortunately, if you’re planning to drive around a lot, you have to prepare to spend a lot of money on gas. Camper vans, especially the larger ones, burn through fuel.

A gasoline station attendant pumps diesel into a car
Photo Credit: Sean Gallup / Getty Images
Photo Credit: Sean Gallup / Getty Images

Pro: You Never Have To Worry About Mowing The Lawn

All of the lawn care and landscape maintenance demands that come with homeownership disappear when your home is mobile. Even if you stay in one place for a while, most campsites manage their own greenery.

A large RV camper is parked off the Bow Valley Parkway in Banff
Photo Credit: George Rose / Getty Images
Photo Credit: George Rose / Getty Images