Recreate The Most Famous Drinks From Around The World Right In Your Home

If you’re a cocktail lover, it is never a bad idea to add a few notches to your belt and learn how to make a few drinks from around the world. Not only will this impress your guests, but you just deserve a five-star bar in your own home.

Many of these drinks probably have ingredients you already own, while others can get a little more complicated.

Brazil: Caipirinha

Caipirinha
Photo: @caipirinhaprendada / Instagram
Photo: @caipirinhaprendada / Instagram

This is the drink of choice in Brazil, where people love to relax and party. It is made of a spirit, known there as “cachaça,” mixed with sugar, ice, and squashed fresh limes.

To create the perfect blend of sweet and tart, mix in the sugar with a lethal dose of cachaça. Watch out, it’s a strong one.

Canada: Caesar

Ceaser
Photo: @mexicanoos / Instagram
Photo: @mexicanoos / Instagram

Walter Chell created the Caesar, inspired by spaghetti with tomato sauce and clams, an Italian dish from Venice. To make your own Caesar, mix vodka with Clamato (a mix of clam and tomato juice), hot sauce, celery, and lime. You can also find premade mixtures that you simply add to vodka.

France: Death In The Afternoon

Death In The Afternoon
Photo: @tasteoffrancemag / Instagram
Photo: @tasteoffrancemag / Instagram

This is a cocktail that was invented by Ernest Hemingway in the 1930s while he was writing in Paris, so it is often referred to as the Hemingway Champagne, or even The Hemingway. It is made with absinthe and champagne, so it is both bubbly and milky in appearance.

Spain: Sangria

sangria
Photo: @bellasangria / Instagram
Photo: @bellasangria / Instagram

Sangria is named after the Spanish word for blood. It can be made with red or white wine, although it is traditionally red.

The wine is then mixed with strong tasting fruits (mostly berries), which is mixed with some kind of juice (usually orange) and hard liquor (like brandy).

France: Absinthe

Absinthe
Photo: @the_4barmen / Instagram
Photo: @the_4barmen / Instagram

If you want to play on the riskier side, try this French liquor, which is is one of the most alcoholic drinks in the world at around 80% alcohol content. Some even say it can be mind-altering and hallucinogenic. It was declared illegal in France in 1915, but legalized there and in the rest of the European Union since, so drink responsibly.

Cuba: Daiquiri

Daiquiri
Photo: @the_guest_bartender / Instagram
Photo: @the_guest_bartender / Instagram

Guess what: you can kind of thank Hemmingway again for this drink!

The daiquiri was invented out of necessity when a mining company official needed cocktail ingredients to offer drinks to his visiting friends in the town of Daiquiri. He grabbed some readily available rum, lime, mint, and a bit of sugar, and mixed them together. The drink was then taken to Havana where Hemmingway discovered it, drank it almost every day, and popularized it.

Singapore: Singapore Sling

Singapore Sling
Photo: @cocktailswithmenyc / Instagram
Photo: @cocktailswithmenyc / Instagram

This drink has a very nice color, but it’s achieved with a bunch of ingredients that you might not necessarily have on hand. It is made from gin, Cherry Heering, Cointreau, Bénédictine, a dash of bitters, pineapple juice, lime juice, and grenadine.

Japan: Sake

sake
Photo: @hannyatousea / Instagram
Photo: @hannyatousea / Instagram

This classic Japenese drink can be consumed straight out of carton juice boxes on the streets in Japan. The drink is made out of fermented rice. It is considered one of the oldest drinks in the world, and sake is an integral part of Japanese culture and history. Sake can be served either warm or cold.

Dominican Republic: Mama Juana

Mama Juana
Photo: @the_gentlemans_flavor/ Instagram
Photo: @the_gentlemans_flavor/ Instagram

Mama Juana is a mixture of rum, red wine, honey, tree bark, and herbs soaked in a bottle. It is said that thanks to its healthyish ingredients, this drink has positive effects on health, such as being used as a flu remedy or to help digestion and circulation of blood to the kidneys and liver.

Australia: Long Black

Long Black
Photo: @foxetginger / Instagram
Photo: @foxetginger / Instagram

If you need an alcohol break, this drink will surely do the trick. It combines an espresso shot with hot water, by pouring or directly extracting the espresso into a cup of hot water. This allows it to remain thick and foamy at the top and wake you right up before making your next drink.

Thailand: Siam Sunray

Siam Sunray
Photo: @marayaresort / Instagram
Photo: @marayaresort / Instagram

Although this drink was only created in 2009 as a way to lure in tourists, it has already become the county’s signature drink. Watch out, it’s not for the weak of heart, as it’s made with fresh lemongrass and red chillies, and is sure to be a little spicy. Other ingredients include vodka, coconut liqueur, ginger, lime, and soda water.

Germany: Glühwein

Glühwein
Photo: @brighteducation.id/ Instagram
Photo: @brighteducation.id/ Instagram

This is basically a warm and sweet mulled wine that is prepared with wine, sugar, cinnamon, lemon, and cloves. The trick is to keep drinking it until you feel like you can pronounce its German name (just kidding).

Hong Kong: Bubble Tea

bubble tea
Photo: @dailybobbafeed / Instagram
Photo: @dailybobbafeed / Instagram

Here is another non-alcoholic drink you should try on the days you are trying to clear out your system.

It is made of iced milk tea and chewy tapioca “bubbles” at the bottom. The original bubble tea flavors are made with either black or green tea, with or without milk. You can, however, make it in any flavor you like, even in slushy styles like mango.

Austria: Schnapps

Schnapps
Photo: holger link / Unsplash
Photo: holger link / Unsplash

The word “Schnapps” is the German equivalent for the word “swallow.” In Germany and Austria, they use “Schnapps” to refer any strong alcoholic drink, but the brand has come to be known worldwide as a fruit-flavored spirit that is so good it can be consumed (or swallowed) straight.

United States: Mai Tai

Mai Tai
Photo: @sideshowpete_ / Instagram
Photo: @sideshowpete_ / Instagram

Mai Tai means “good” in Tahitian, but this drink was popularized in Oakland in 1944 as a rum-based cocktail.

It is made with either spiced or coconut-flavored rum which is added to lime juice, orgeat syrup, and orange liqueur. For extra flair, you can add grapefruit juice or grenadine. Shake it all with some ice and voila.

Fun fact: Elvis Presley promoted this drink in his movie Blue Hawaii.

Peru And Chile: Pisco Sour

Pisco Sour
Photo: @malibubarramovil / Instagram
Photo: @malibubarramovil / Instagram

This interesting drink has a few variations, but the Peruvian version includes Pisco, lime juice, syrup, egg white, and Angostura bitters. In Chile, they just use Pisco, lemon juice, and sugar if you’re looking for an easier version to make at home.

Iceland: Brennivín

Brennivín
Photo: @Thomasburgerjointdk / Instagram
Photo: @Thomasburgerjointdk / Instagram

This drink is also known as “black death” as it means “burning wine” when translated into English. But really, it’s Iceland’s version of gin, except it’s flavored with caraway, cumin, and angelica. Brennivín is so popular across Iceland, it has become its “signature distilled beverage.”

England: Ginger Beer

ginger beer
Photo: @heartsease_farm / Instagram
Photo: @heartsease_farm / Instagram

Originally, ginger beer was brewed from fermented ginger, sugar, and water, but today it has less than .5% alcohol, so it is no longer classified as alcoholic. When it first originated in England, the drink had about 11% alcohol. It is usually carbonated and can be cloudy or clear.

Denmark: Karnemelk

buttermilk
Photo: johann trasch / Unsplash
Photo: johann trasch / Unsplash

The name translates to Buttermilk, and it is a fermented dairy drink. Traditionally, it was the liquid left behind after churning butter out of cultured cream. It has a neutral taste but is widely consumed during lunch in Denmark and Holland.

Not a bad idea to get some calcium in before a heavy night of drinking later. Or you can try a buttermilk margarita (pictured).

Serbia: Slivovitz

Slivovka
Photo: @thirst.for.life / Instagram
Photo: @thirst.for.life / Instagram

Slivovitz is a fruit brandy made from damson plums, and often known as plum brandy. In fact, it is Serbia’s national drink, and plum is its national fruit. They have a saying that goes: “the best place to build a house is where a plum tree grows,” so it’s only fitting.